Stripping – Part 2

strippers2

Jar of stripper – Aircraft Stripper – Bix Spray-on Stripper

Stripping Bodies and Parts – Part 2

Now that we’ve discussed the products for stripping, lets take a look at how the process is actually done:

WARNING:  These products are extremely hazardous to your health and the environment.  Proper safety glasses, respirator, ventilated area and gloves should be used at all times.  Also, please respect the environment when disposing of used chemicals and chemical contaminated rags and towels.  Consult your local restrictions regard this process.  Do to the dangerous nature of the use of the products, the information here is merely a suggested process.  Safety and proper use are the responsibility of the Hobbyist – Hot World Customs take no responsibility for any use or mis-use of the products referenced on this site.

Using a Stripping Product as Pictured Above: 

Step 1 : You can see, in the photo above, a one-quart Mason jar is filled 1/2 full with paint stripper. A jar was used because it’s impervious to the effects of the stripper, seal able, and you’re able to keep an eye on the fluid level. Others have used cooking pots, coffee cans with lids, various bowls, etc. Whatever you decide to use, just add the appropriate amount of stripper and prepare to disrobe… errr… strip.

Step 2: With the Mason jar of stripper, step 2 consists of simply dropping your diecast bodies into the jar. Be certain that you’ve removed all or the plastic and window glass pieces prior to dunking as stripper will dissolve them fairly quickly and/or render them useless!

Step 3: This is the waiting period and is mostly dependant upon the type of stripper you’ve chosen. With aircraft stripper, your waiting period can be measured in minutes… seconds, even. With a lesser-grade stripper hours may be necessary… days even. Just remember that patience is a virtue.  In most cases longer is better, even with the powerful strippers a little extra time may just save you some of the work on the details lines with a wire brush.

Step 4: The next step is to remove the body[ies] from the stripper. Some use a straightened metal coat hanger with a hook bent into one end.  Others – wearing chemical resistant gloves – will reach in with their fingers.  DO NOT USE YOUR BARE HANDS! You really don’t want to have much skin contact with the stripper. Any product designed to strip paint off of metal cannot be especially conducive to skin conditioning. Corrosive-resistant, waterproof, synthetic gloves are a good safety option even if you are using the “hook” method. The first priority upon removing the diecast body is to get it rinsed off.  Because of this, it is recommended removing the bodies in the vicinity of the sink or hose.  Rinse the bodies of stripper and wipe down thoroughly.

Step 5: After removing and rinsing your body it may be necessary to administer a scrubbing with a small wire brush to remove any stubborn paint from cracks and crevices. An X-Acto knife may also prove handy in coaxing stubborn paint from corners.  This can also be done later with a wire brush attachment on your rotary tool.

Step 6: Once the final paint is removed from the cracks and the stripper has been washed, scrub the entire body with soap and water.  A standard scrub brush is helpful here to get all remaining stripper off of the body and clean the piece for body prep.  Any stripper left on the body can damage further paint and body work later.

 

Using a Carburator Cleaning Product such as “Chem-Dip”: 

Step 1:  A gallon can of “Chem-Dip” includes a parts basket for use immersing the parts to be cleaned.  After opening the can, slowly remove the rack allowing it to drain.

Step 2:  With the basket removed simply drop your diecast bodies inside it and put the basket back inside of the can. The chemical should fill the inside of the basket and cover the bodies completely. Replace the lid to avoid evaporation.  As with the previous process, be certain that you’ve removed all or the plastic and window glass pieces prior to dunking as stripper will dissolve them fairly quickly and/or render them useless! The basket is fairly big so it will allow you to do a number of pieces all at once.

Step 3:  This cleaner works very quickly with most cars being ready within a matter of 10-15 minutes.  It is still recommended you leave it longer for a complete stripping.

Step 4: Remove the basket with the body(s) from the cleaner allowing the pieces and the basket to drain . AGAIN, DO NOT USE YOUR BARE HANDS! You really don’t want to have much skin contact with the stripper. Any product designed to strip paint off of metal cannot be especially conducive to skin conditioning. Corrosive-resistant, waterproof, synthetic gloves are a good safety option  The first priority upon removing the diecast body is to get it wiped off. Using a rag, wipe the body down as completely as possible.  This prevents the harmful chemicals from going down the drain when rinsed.

Step 5: Once the piece has been thoroughly wiped down, scrub the entire body with soap and water.  A standard scrub brush is helpful here to get all remaining chemical off of the body and clean the piece for body prep.  Any chemicals left on the body can damage further paint and body work later.  Touch-up and necessary areas with a wire brush.

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