Safety First!!

safety

WARNING: Safety is a serious issue overlooked only by a foolish few. The items pictured below: Disposable respirator, canister respirator, latex gloves, leather glove and safety glasses should be a vital part of any customizer’s inventory! Here are the best uses for each item:


Respirator[s] – We suggest the best respirator you can afford. Especially when spraying urethanes or, if you’re so inclined, Imrons. These are the nastiest paints on the market for the general public. Use a quality canister-type respirator if at all possible. But remember, any protection is better than no protection!  A dust mask is also recommended when sanding and grinding – this prevents the customizer from inhaling the floating particles.   

Gloves – Latex gloves are handy when working with or mixing paint. A common novice mistake (and occasional expert mistake) is having paint on your fingers from a previous task and then picking up a nicely painted diecast body only to leave fresh finger prints of color all over it! Frequent hand cleansing can also help to prevent this scenario. I consider leather gloves (or a single glove) a necessity when holding cars to be drilled apart. The issue is somewhat less critical when using a rotary tool or a drill press to drill your bases… the high speed (low torque) discourages the bit from grabbing like that – HOWEVER, it is still recommended. 

Safety Glasses/Goggles – We strongly urge you to always wear eye protection when using power tools, particularly your rotary tool (aka – Dremel). Tiny, high-speed, metal projectiles are especially difficult to remove from your eyes and painful to boot! And then, of course, there’s the all-too-real possibility of blinding yourself for life.  Basically, it is not worth the risk.  

Any safety gear you currently use, or are considering using, will likely only aid in your personal welfare. Things like working close to a sink, or having a nicely lit work area are always safety features that can help.  Just remember that your best piece of safety equipment is sitting at the top of your neck!

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